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AUTOMOTIVE DYNOJET 248H


 

The Dynojet Chassis Dynamometer has become the industry standard in chassis dynamometers worldwide because of its revolutionary ability to measure horsepower/torque with repeatability, accuracy and consistency.  The dynojet is accurate within 1% from Dynojet to Dynojet anywhere in the world!  This enabled the communication and sharing of test data.

How?
Isaac Newton said, (Force=Mass x Acceleration)
Force (horsepower) = Mass (weight of drums) x Acceleration (provided by the vehicle being tested)

A combination of two laws of physics, force equals mass times acceleration and work equals force times distance, gives us this equation: W=m X a X d. "W" is the work, in pounds-feet, the rear wheels are doing, "m" is mass equivalent (the drums), "a" is acceleration (increasing drive wheel speed) and "d" is distance (drum circumference). Once we have the work, we can find horsepower. One horsepower is 550 pounds-feet of work done in one second so, we divide the work number by the length of time measured, then divide the number we get from that by 550. To simplify: we get horsepower by multiplying the mass, acceleration and the distance, then dividing that product by time multiplied by 550. This can be expressed by: hp = (m X a X d) ÷ (t X 550).

Torque can be figured by multiplying the horsepower by a constant, 5252, then dividing that product by the speed at which the thrust force was measured. Generally, with rear wheel numbers, axle ratio is not considered in the torque computation. For comparison purposes, this makes more sense. The computer factors out the axle ratio by using engine speed data in the torque derivation.

Since the only variable in the equation is the vehicle, we can measure the amount of horsepower a vehicle produces at the rear wheels with an extremely high level of accuracy and repeatability. There are up to 4000 sample points in a typical Dynojet horsepower test! Dynojets use the (SAE J1349 rev. June 1990) correction factor, this is the lastest correction factor in use today. Allowing our customers to compare results with each other from over 600 Dynojets worldwide. Test can also be measured using DIN, EEC, and STD correction factors.

The dynojet has become the lie detector of the industry.

An inertia dyno differs from a brake dyno in several ways:

1) it has no active power absorption device

2) it's more accurate

3) it's easier on the vehicles being tested

4) it's easier to use.

Another problem with some brake-type chassis dynos is they lack the accuracy and repeatability demanded by many performance-aftermarket manufacturers and tuners.

Overheating the tires and the tendency of cars to try and jump off the rollers are also eliminated. Also, vehicles do not need to be loaded down against the rollers which also reduces heat build up and increased frictional losses through the tires.

That’s why Dynojet is the chassis dyno of choice for names like:

LINGENFELTER, BORLA, HENNESSEY, ROBERT YATES, KENNY BROWN, STEEDA, HKS, KENNE BELL, PENSKE, ROUSCH, A.J. FOYT, JAVIER GUTIERREZ, NASCAR, ETC. . . .

With Competition Data Systems data acquisition we can simultaneously map and plot RPM, time, and wheel speed.

-Fuel Pressure
-Boost Pressure
-Manifold Pressure
-Air Temp
-Fuel Flow
-Wide Band Air to Fuel
-Horsepower and Torque
-We can also do speedometer calibrations



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